Overview

Being scheduled to take place after the publication of the Women and Equalities Committee inquiry into Older people and employment, this event would be an opportunity for policymakers and delegates alike to discuss how, in an increasingly aging population, older people can be supported for longer in the workplace. The event will also follow John Cridland’s recently published Independent review of the State Pension age and the Government’s forthcoming review of the SPA, and will consider the implications on both businesses and workers of an increase in the SPA.

Building on the Government’s Fuller Working Lives strategy, published in February, the event will assess what needs to be done to retain, retrain and recruit older workers. Delegates will consider how business can support those in most need, including older women, those with long-term illnesses or disabilities and BAME groups, to ensure their working lives are not only improved but extended. Delegates will also discuss ways in which the Government can work better with employers and education providers to identify skills gaps and support workers as they get older to undergo on-the-job training or up-skilling to ensure they have the necessary skills for evolving workplaces. Attendees will also consider how to overcome age discrimination in the labour market, looking at current recruitment practices, as well as identifying and overcoming barriers to working later in life, such as healthcare issues or care responsibilities.


Agenda
Start

08:30 - 09:00
Registration

 

09:00 - 09:05
Chair's Welcoming Remarks

 
To be announced

09:05 - 09:35
Older People in the Workplace: Strategies to reduce barriers to later-life working

 
Questions, Comments and Discussion

09:35 - 10:20
Retain: Incentives for Later Life working, Tackling Inequalities and Encouraging Inclusivity in the Workplace

 
  •   With 1 in 4 of the working age population over 50, why is it important to reduce early exit from the labour market?
  • What are the challenges and opportunities of an ageing workforce, and how can both employees and employers benefit?
  • How could new legislation, such as reforms to the State Pension Age, help support the Fuller Working Lives strategy and encourage people to continue working in later life? How might the State Pension be reformed to introduce more flexibility and deferral arrangements, as recommended by John Cridland In his Independent Review of the State Pension Age Smoothing the Transition?
  • What more can be done to bring employers on-board, incentivise inclusivity and encourage businesses to consider the ageing workforce as a priority?
  • What more should employers do to retain their existing older employees, for example offering flexible or remote working, to make employment in later life more appealing to older people?
  • Are standardised employee benefits attractive for people of all ages and in what ways could they be adapted to better suit the over 50s?
  • What mechanisms, internal and external, are in place to support older people facing other workplace barriers such as women, BMEs and people with long-term illnesses or disabilities? Many over-50s have caring responsibilities outside of the workplace, whether it be for parents or grandchildren, so how can they be supported to stay in the labour market?

---Questions, Comments and Discussion---


10:20 - 10:50
Making the Labour Market Work for All: How should businesses adapt for an ageing workforce?

 
Questions, Comments and Discussion

Speakers

Andy Briggs Chief Executive Officer, UK Insurance, Aviva and Government Business Champion for Older Workers

Read profile


10:50 - 10:55
Chair's Closing Remarks

 
To be announced

10:55 - 11:20
Refreshment and Networking Break

 

11:20 - 11:25
Chair's Welcome Back

 
To be announced

11:25 - 12:10
Retrain: Reskilling, Refreshing and Reforming the Adult Skills System

 
  • With an ageing workforce, how can employers avoid skills and knowledge gaps and ensure access to training and professional development?
  • What are the challenges and opportunities of overcoming digital skills gaps?
  • How can employers benefit from providing opportunities for reskilling or upskilling to existing employers?
  • Who are the trailblazers in utilising the experience and knowledge of older employees to mentor and train the next generation of recruits?
  • How are individuals being encouraged to refresh their skills or reinvent themselves with a career change? And what are the main barriers to changing your career later in life? What opportunities are available for people wanting to reskill or retrain?
  • How can the Government’s apprenticeship programme be used to support the reskilling and training of older workers, and what more can be done to develop bespoke apprenticeship programmes for adult and older learners?
  • What needs to be done in terms of reforming the adult skills system to ensure that older employees are appropriately equipped to succeed in the current labour market?      
  • The Industrial Strategy Green Paper highlights a need to improve for STEM skills but also claims that older workers are less likely to up-skill or re-skill; what more should be done to provide life-long educational opportunities and encourage people to refresh their skills or reinvent their career throughout their working lives? 

---Questions, Comments and Discussion---


12:10 - 12:55
Recruit: Age Blind Recruitment, Specialist Support and Experience Vs Qualifications

 
  • With a reported 1 million unemployed people aged 54-60 willing to work, what are the barriers to entering the labour market for those approaching pension age?
  • What does an inclusive recruitment process look like and how does age blind recruitment work in practice?
  • How can those involved in the recruitment process increase their awareness of age discrimination and what role should specialist recruitment agencies play in this process? Given that older people are more likely to have no formal qualifications than younger people, and some will have O-levels when a job specification calls for GCSEs, how can companies ensure they’re not indirectly discriminating against older jobseekers? How important is it to encourage all those involved in the recruitment process to be more flexible on required qualifications and use experience and transferable skills as measurement of employability? 
  • What help is available for older people who are wanting to re-enter the labour market? What are the main difficulties faced and how can older unemployed people be supported from the CV writing process to the interview?
  • What role do organisations like the Jobcentre Plus play in providing appropriate and effective support to older jobseekers and how effective are dedicated Older Claimant Champions in specialising in finding work for the over 50s?

---Questions, Comments and Discussion---


12:55 - 13:00
Chair's Final Remarks

 

End

Speakers

Andy Briggs Chief Executive Officer, UK Insurance, Aviva and Government Business Champion for Older Workers

Read profile


Sponsors & Exhibitors

Cambridge Assessment


Venue details

Central London


Speakers
X Close