Overview

The Current State of Education in Prisons – Trends in Prisoner Outcomes, Progress Made Since the Coates Review and Implementing the White Paper

With almost half of the prison population estimated to have no school qualifications and 60% of offenders leaving prison with no identifiable education or employability outcomes, delegates will assess the current state of education and training provision available in the UK justice system, particularly in the context of at the time of Dame Sally’s review, Ofsted rated 27 prisons as requiring improvement. Delegates will also discuss how far the Government’s White Paper will go to address concerns, including how to implement a core common curriculum across the estate, the potential impact of a new Prison Service ‘Teach First’ Recruitment Scheme to attract skilled graduates to the sector, as well as how an annual league table of prison performance, alongside individual prisoner learning plans, might drive up standards. Delegates will also look at the role Ofsted, exam boards and others have in designing, improving and delivering prison education.

Education and Training: The Silver Bullet of Recidivism? – Rehabilitation, Reducing Reoffending and Reintegration into Society

Delegates will consider the role of education in the prison system, and how better education of prisoners can reduce reoffending rates, help reintegrate offenders back into their communities on release and improve employment outcomes for those with a criminal record. Delegates will hear about the recommendations from the recent House of Commons Work & Pensions Select Committee report on Support for ex-offenders, particularly assessing whether current employment and education programmes provide sufficient support to ensure ex-offenders can be reintegrated into the workplace and put them in good stead to find work opportunities on release. Sessions will also discuss how to change employer attitudes towards those with a criminal record, given that 50% of employers are unlikely to even consider offering an ex-offender a job, and assess whether reducing the National Insurance contributions of those employers actively employing former prisoners could be a successful incentive.

Making it Easier to Improve the Standard and Availability of Prisoner Education – Giving More Power to Governors, Creating Partnerships and the Role of Apprenticeships

Sessions will also look at how to improve upon existing education programmes being delivered in prisons, particularly through the creation and cultivation of partnerships with universities, colleges, local authorities and employers. Delegates will look at how data can be better utilised to identify labour market gaps in local areas surrounding prison estates so that Governors can choose to offer course better suited to their prison to help offenders into employment, as well as how the Release on Temporary License can be used to offer work placements within local businesses. Attendees will also consider how the probation service, Prison Work Coaches and National Careers Service advisors could better work together to offer more comprehensive advice and guidance to prisoners looking to further their education and employment opportunities. Sessions will also discuss the Government’s pledge, from April 2017, to give Governors more power and responsibility over the budgets and decisions for education provision once current contracts end and assess how this will allow for a more revitalised and tailored education system as well as how the new Prisoner Apprenticeships Pathway might work in practice.


Agenda
Start

00:00 - 00:30
Building on Existing Provision: Designing and Implementing New Contracts, Support for Officers and Partnerships with External Parties

 
  • Assessment of the extent to which the recommendations from the Coates Review have been implemented so far and whether the White Paper goes far enough to reform the current system.
  • The role of Governors, Ofsted, exam boards and others in designing, improving and delivering prison education, particularly in the context of the forthcoming expiration of current contracts and the Government’s pledge to give Governors more responsibility over budgets and decisions.
  • Consideration of how an annual league table of prison performance, alongside individual prisoner learning plans, might drive up standards and whether a core common curriculum across the estate state can be achieved.
  • The potential for a new Prison Service ‘Teach First’ Recruitment Scheme and whether there is enough support for existing staff, as well as how technology might assist deliverance.
  • How the creation and cultivation of partnerships with universities, colleges, local authorities and employers can help improve and deliver high-quality education programmes and examples of best practice collaboration already in existence. 
  • The potential for vocational programmes and assessing how the new Prisoner Apprenticeships Pathway might work in practice.

08:30 - 09:00
Registration, Coffee and Networking

 

09:00 - 09:05
Chair and Policy-UK Welcoming remarks

 

Speakers

Lord Ramsbotham Co-Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Group on Penal Affairs

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09:05 - 09:30
Reforming Prison Education: Implementing the White Paper

 

10:30 - 10:55
Ensuring the Delivery of High Quality Education

 

10:55 - 11:00
Chair’s Closing Comments

 

Speakers

Lord Ramsbotham Co-Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Group on Penal Affairs

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11:00 - 11:30
Refreshments and Networking break

 

11:30 - 11:55
The Chair’s Welcome Back

 

11:30 - 11:55
Support for Ex-Offenders: Does Prison Education Work?

 

Speakers

Karen Buck MP Member, House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee

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11:55 - 12:55
Looking Towards Life After Prison: Education and its Role in Rehabilitation, Changing Attitudes and Ensuring Employment Outcomes

 
  • The role education and training plays in reducing reoffending and creating a learning culture within institutions.
  • Consider ways to change employer attitudes towards those with a criminal record, and assess whether reducing the National Insurance contributions of employers actively employing former prisoners could be a successful incentive.
  • Evaluate recommendations from the House of Commons Work & Pensions Select Committee report on Support for ex-offenders.
  • Linking local employment needs to programmes within prison to ensure offenders have the best possible chance to achieve positive work outcomes on release and how the Release on Temporary License can be used to offer work placements within local businesses. 
  • Discussions of how the probation service, Prison Work Coaches and National Careers Service advisors could better work together to offer more comprehensive advice and guidance to prisoners.

12:55 - 13:00
Chair’s and Policy-UK’s Thanks

 

End

Speakers

Karen Buck MP Member, House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee

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Lord Ramsbotham Co-Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Group on Penal Affairs

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Venue details

Central London


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