Key Points
  • Diagnosis, Treatment and the Freedom to Choose
  • Ending Stigma, Reducing Risk and Promoting Good Mental Wellbeing
  • Integration and collaboration: healthcare, social care and police
Guest of Honour

Paul Farmer Chief Executive, Mind

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Overview
Taking place a year after the publication of The Five Year Forward View this conference will assess the successfulness of its implementation, what progress has been made so far and explore the strategy for moving forward over the next four years in mental health in the UK. Expert speakers from across the sector will facilitate open discussion on topics such as innovations in diagnosis and treatment, prevention strategies, plans for more joined up services and sector specific challenges and opportunities. Dedicated break-out sessions also allow delegates to engage in intimate discussion forums about Student Mental Health, Perinatal Mental Health, Men’s Mental Health and Older People and Mental Health.

Innovations in Mental Health

Discussions will include an assessment of recent innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness, the role of the internet and smartphones in changing the way people access mental health support and ways in which the NHS engage with the digital revolution to provide more accessible and effective care for mental health patients. Delegates will also explore the importance of patient choice and empowerment and will consider evidence-based changes for service users as well assessing the success of IAPT in enabling this.

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Prevention is Better than Cure

Given that prevention has been identified as a public priority according to The Five Year Forward View for Mental Health, delegates will hear the latest strategies being used to promote good mental health and reduce the number of people requiring treatment for mental illness. Discussions will also include the social determinants and risk factors associated with mental ill health and how better understanding of these factors can produce more effective and targeted prevention strategies.

Speakers will also consider the need to continue reducing the stigma and spreading awareness of mental health risks at every stage of life, and the role of non-healthcare and voluntary organisations in changing the public mind-set.

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Workforce, Service Provision and Joined up Services

Delegates will explore the potential challenges and opportunities presented by plans to integrate physical and mental health and the benefits that could arise from a holistic approach to treating the patient not the illness. Discussion will also focus on the role of should social work in an integrated mental health care model and the pressure on non-healthcare related fields such as the police to fill the gaps left by understaffing in the mental health sector.

Speakers will also address the needs of the workforce and the priorities for training and recruiting high quality staff to deliver efficient and effective mental health services.


Agenda
Start

09:00 - 09:30
Registration, Coffee and Networking

 

09:30 - 09:35
Chair and Policy-UK Welcoming remarks

 

Speakers

Helen Whately MP Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group for Mental Health and Member of Parliament for Faversham and Mid Kent

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09:35 - 10:00
Mental Health Strategy for the Next Five Years Implementing the Mental Health Taskforce Five Year Forward View

 

Speakers

Paul Farmer Chief Executive, Mind

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10:00 - 10:45
Innovations in Mental Health: Diagnosis, Treatment and the Freedom to Choose

 
FOCUS POINTS:
  • How have recent innovations improved the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness?
  • How are the internet and smartphones changing the way people access mental health support and how can the NHS engage with the digital revolution to provide more accessible and effective care for mental health sufferers?
  • How have schemes such as IAPT helped widen access to mental health treatment? How important is the patient’s right to choose and, within reason, control the way they are treated and what support is available to empower them to do so?
  • The voice of the service user: what do patients want and how can services ensure they provide it?

- - - -  Questions, and answer session with delegates - - - -

10:45 - 10:50
Chair’s Closing Comments

 

Speakers

Helen Whately MP Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group for Mental Health and Member of Parliament for Faversham and Mid Kent

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10:50 - 11:15
Coffee, Refreshments and Networking

 

11:15 - 11:20
Chair’s Welcome Back

 

11:20 - 12:05
Prevention is Better Than Cure: Ending Stigma, Reducing Risk and Promoting Good Mental Wellbeing

 
  • Prevention was identified as a key public priority during the public engagement stage of the Taskforce report – The Five Year Forward View for Mental Health but what strategies can be put in place to promote good mental health and reduce the number of people requiring treatment for mental illness?
  • How can our understanding of the social determinants and risk factors associated with mental ill health be used to produce effective and targeted prevention strategies to lessen the impacts and reduce the likelihood of mental illness?
  • Prevention is vital at all stages of life: from early years, during education and work, within relationships and families and in later life. What are the plans for comprehensive cradle to grave support, incorporating mental health promotion into the experiences of pregnant women, children and young people, those seeking treatment for physical illness and the elderly?  
  • How important will non-healthcare institutions and voluntary and communities groups be in targeting the stigma surrounding mental health issues and implementing valuable prevention strategies?

Speakers

Emma Judge Co-Founder, How to Thrive

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Isabella Goldie Director of Development & Delivery, Mental Health Foundation

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Professor Woody Caan Editor, Journal of Public Mental Health

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12:05 - 12:50
Children and Young People: Prevention, Early Intervention and Age Appropriate Care

 

  • Latest figures suggest that three children in every classroom have a diagnosable mental health disorder; what is known about the causes of mental ill health in young people, the manifestations of illness and the issues specific to young people in diagnosing and treating their conditions?
  • What is being done to ensure that parents, teachers and GPs understand the emotional and mental health of children and young people enough to encourage healthy wellbeing and are equipped to identify and raise any concerns in a timely and appropriate manner?
  • How are schemes such as MyApt helping to empower young people and their parents to manage their mental health, access help and have a say in their treatments? How important is it to allow for parent and patient input?
  • What progress is being made to complete the roll-out of the Children and Young People’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (CYP IAPT) programme across England by 2018? What are the current concerns with CAMHS and what are the short-term and long-term priorities for improving services including 24/7 crisis care, access to hospitals close to home and with similar aged patients, consistency of access to a dedicated healthcare professional,  and involvement of parents and carers?



Speakers

Rob Willoughby Area Director, The Children's Society

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Dr Sally Hodges Director of Children, Young Adults and Families Services, The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust

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Alex Goforth Programme Lead, London & South East Children & Young People’s IAPT Collaborative

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12:50 - 12:55
Chair’s Closing Comments

 
To be announced




12:55 - 13:55
Networking Lunch

 

13:55 - 14:00
Chair's Welcome Back

 
To be announced




14:00 - 14:45
Workforce, Service Provision and Joined up Services: Integration and collaboration- healthcare, social care and police

 
  • What would a system with integrated physical and mental health care look like? How would a holistic approach to treating the patient rather than the illness improve outcomes in the short term and long term?
  • What are the challenges and implications of integrating services in terms of data sharing, coordination and communications? Given the added complications what processes will have to be in place to maintain efficiency and quality?
  • What role does and should social work play in an integrated mental health care model? How can social care ease pressure on the healthcare providers and provide more comprehensive care? What are the issues of integration and how can these be overcome?
  • How have staff been affected by recent cuts and what impact does this have on service delivery? How are staff in non-healthcare related fields such as social work and the police having to fill the gaps and how well are they trained to deal with this?
  • What is the role of the police in enforcing Section 136 of the Mental Health Act, what has it become and what should it be? How are the different sections working together to protect those in mental health crises, what pressures are they under and what are the priorities for the future?


Speakers

Emad Lilo Social Care Professional Lead, Mersey Care NHS FT

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Dr Sheila Hardy Senior Research Fellow, Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

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Inspector Michael Brown OBE Mental Health Coordinator, National Police Chiefs Council / College of Policing

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14:45 - 15:35
Breakout Sessions

 
Breakout 1 Student Mental Health:


FOCUS POINTS:
  • With the demand for university mental health services reportedly rising by 50% what effect is this having on their ability to provide the help students need?
  • As more students report mental health issues than ever before what is the role of universities and how can they can they provide the much needed support to those who require it?
  • How can the rise in students reporting mental health issues be explained; what is making the university experience harder for students and how can the risks be minimised? What proactive measures should universities be taking to reduce the amount of students suffering with their mental health? With increasing tuition fees how important is incorporating student welfare and wellbeing promotion into the service provided by universities?

Mel Withers, Head of Counselling, University of Sussex Counselling Service


Breakout 2 Perinatal Mental Health:


FOCUS POINTS:
  • Perinatal mental health issues reportedly affect 10% of women and yet almost half are unable to access specialist help. What specialist help is available and how can access be improved? How can women be better supported throughout pregnancy, birth and the first year to reduce risks of mental illness?
  • How can family members, GPs, midwives and health visitors be better educated to look out for the signs, encourage early intervention and facilitate referral to specialists?
  • What help is available for pregnant women/new mothers who have existing mental illness or develop illness? What services and treatments are available, how effective are they and what are the complications of treating pregnant women/new mother?
  • Do the stigma and fear of reprisals dissuade women from seeking help and what can be done to counteract these effects?

Katrina Ashton, Specialist Midwife Antenatal and Postnatal Mental Health, Medway NHS Foundation Trust


Breakout 3 Men’s Mental Health:

FOCUS POINTS:
  • On average 13 men take their own lives every day in the UK. What do we currently know about why this is happening and why help isn’t being sought sooner or isn’t effective? Why aren’t mental health issues in men being recognised and diagnosed in time? Is there a difference between the way illness presents itself in men and in women which accounts for different rates of diagnosis?
  • Why do men still find it hard to open up about mental illness and what can be done to reduce the stigma? Men are much more likely to become alcohol-dependant than women. What does this show us about self-medicating and how can this knowledge be used to pick up cases of mental illness in men and treat it in conjunction with the physical?
  • How have strategies been implemented to break down the stigma, get men talking about mental health and direct those in need to the appropriate services?  

Professor Steve Robertson, Professor of Men, Health & Gender, Leeds Beckett University

Breakout 4 Older People and Mental Health:


FOCUS POINTS:
  • Maintaining good mental health in older age is just as important as physical health but how does mental health change as people get older? What are the specific risks for the elderly and what can be done to reduce these effects and promote healthy wellbeing?
  • 85% of older people with depression receive no help from the NHS and those that do are more likely to be on medication than talking therapies compared to young people. How can the differences between diagnosis and treatment for older people and for younger people be explained? Is it beneficial or should action be taken to reduce the disparities?
  • What impact does stigma and the misconceptions about mental health in older age have on people’s ability to recognise a problem and seek help for it?
  • As an increasing amount of mental health aids move online what does this mean for the older generation? How else can older people receive support and advice on maintaining mental wellbeing? How important in the battle against loneliness is ensuring that older people receive face-to-face support?

Speakers under consideration



Speakers

Katrina Ashton Specialist Midwife Antenatal and Postnatal Mental Health, Medway NHS Foundation Trust

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Professor Steve Robertson Professor of Men, Health & Gender, Leeds Beckett University

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Mel Withers Head of Counselling, University of Sussex Counselling Service

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15:35 - 15:55
Care in Crisis: Responding to Mental Health Emergencies

 
Speaker invitations under consideration

- - - -  Questions, and answer session with delegates - - - -




15:55 - 16:00
Chair’s and Policy-UK’s Thanks

 
To be announced




End

Speakers

Paul Farmer Chief Executive, Mind

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Katrina Ashton Specialist Midwife Antenatal and Postnatal Mental Health, Medway NHS Foundation Trust

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Inspector Michael Brown OBE Mental Health Coordinator, National Police Chiefs Council / College of Policing

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Professor Woody Caan Editor, Journal of Public Mental Health

Read profile

Alex Goforth Programme Lead, London & South East Children & Young People’s IAPT Collaborative

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Isabella Goldie Director of Development & Delivery, Mental Health Foundation

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Dr Sheila Hardy Senior Research Fellow, Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

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Dr Sally Hodges Director of Children, Young Adults and Families Services, The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust

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Emma Judge Co-Founder, How to Thrive

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Emad Lilo Social Care Professional Lead, Mersey Care NHS FT

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Professor Steve Robertson Professor of Men, Health & Gender, Leeds Beckett University

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Helen Whately MP Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group for Mental Health and Member of Parliament for Faversham and Mid Kent

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Rob Willoughby Area Director, The Children's Society

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Mel Withers Head of Counselling, University of Sussex Counselling Service

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Supporters & Contributors

Mind

The Children's Society


Venue details

The King's Fund 11-13 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0AN

Venue website


Speakers
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